Mastech MS8229 Auto-Range 5-in-1 Digital Multimeter


Mastech MS8229 Auto-Range 5-in-1 Digital Multimeter Review: Features & Specifications

The mastech ms8229 auto-range 5 in 1 digital multimeter is a new model from mastech company. It comes with many features including auto/manual range, analog display, battery level indicator, alarm function and much more.

Features:

Auto/Manual Range – This feature allows the user to select between two different levels of sensitivity. For example, if the meter reads 0.01% when it detects a voltage drop of 10mV, then it will automatically switch off after 10 minutes or until the voltage drops below 0.01%.

If the voltage goes above 0.01%, then it will continue to measure until it reaches 0%.

Battery Level Indicator – When the battery level drops below a certain point, the alarm sound is played. This can be used to indicate that the batteries are running low.

Alarm Sound – A loud alarm sound is played when the meter detects a voltage drop of 10mV or less. The alarm sound may be turned off by pressing and holding down the Stop button for three seconds. Pressing and holding down the Stop button for five seconds turns off all alarms.

Analog Display – This meter features a classic, easy-to-read analog display. From the moment the multimeter is turned on, it begins displaying an analog voltage reading. The higher the voltage, the closer to the right side of the display the needle will be.

The lower the voltage, the closer to the left side of the display the needle will be.

Resolution – This is the smallest amount of voltage that the meter can detect. For example, if a multimeter has a resolution of 2V and it detects a 2.01V voltage drop, then it will display 2.00V.

AC/DC – This allows you to measure both alternating current and direct current.

A/D – This allows you to switch between displaying the voltage in fractional form or in decimal form.

Mastech MS8229 Auto-Range 5-in-1 Digital Multimeter at realmanguide.net

Continuity – This feature allows you to detect whether a continuous electrical current is flowing through a conductor. For example, if the multimeter is set to AC Voltage mode and points at your body, it will detect whether an electrical current is flowing through your body. If an electrical current is detected, then the meter will display a number that represents the size of the current (in this case 0).

If no current is detected, then the meter will display a “0”.

Diode Check – This feature allows you to detect whether a diode (a type of electronic component) installed in an electronic circuit is functioning properly or not. This can help you determine whether a certain part of your circuit is working or not.

Zener Diode Test – This mode allows you to test zener diodes, which are a type of electronic component. This function is only for testing and shouldn’t be used in place of a proper zener diode.

Infinity – This allows you to measure extremely high voltages (such as the voltage of a thunderstorm).

Continuous Power – This feature allows you to measure a high-power DC current. For example, if you place the multimeter inside a car’s battery, it can detect how much power is being delivered to the car’s electrical system. This allows you to make sure your car’s alternator is working properly.

Voltage Drop – This helps you check how much resistance a particular wire has. For example, if you have a 10ft piece of wire that runs from the front of your house to the back, and you are wondering how much power it is losing along the way due to resistance, you can place both multimeter probes on one end of the wire and measure the voltage. Then you can move to the other end of the wire and measure the voltage again.

The difference in these two measurements is how much power is being lost due to resistance. We recommend using Voltmeter Mode for this feature.

Dual-Range – This allows you to measure both high and low voltages with a single setting. For example, if you have a multimeter with 10V and 1000V settings, the highest setting is for high voltages and the lowest setting is for low voltages. If you connect the probes to a 9V battery, the meter displays 9V.

But if you connect the probes to a 9V battery while in the 1000V range, the meter displays 90V, which is the closest reading it can give you without switching to the low-voltage range.

Continual Voltage – This feature allows you to measure alternating current (such as the type of current that comes from a wall outlet).

Polarity – AC/DC allows you to measure both alternating current and direct current. For example, you can use this setting to measure the voltage of a car battery while the car engine is running.

Mastech MS8229 Auto-Range 5-in-1 Digital Multimeter - Image

Size – This feature allows you to determine how much electrical energy is being used by a device. For example, if you wanted to know how much energy your coffee maker is using, you can use this setting to determine the amount of watts the device is drawing from the wall outlet.

Log – This allows you to continuously measure the electrical current of a stable power source such as a battery. For example, if you place the multimeter probes on the terminals of an unused car battery, your device can continuously read how much voltage or amperage is being delivered by the battery. This feature can be very useful for monitoring how much power your solar panel array is providing.

If you’re careful, you can use the multimeter to check for electrical signals in a wire, such as an alarm system that may or may not be armed. This can help you determine if a certain section of your house has an alarm system or not.

However, it’s important to note that this type of multimeter will not detect low-frequency signals such as those used by wireless home security systems. For this, you would need a different type of instrument known as a tone probe.

But unless you are planning on installing multiple security systems within a home (and why would you do that?

), a multimeter should be sufficient for your needs.

Here are some additional things to keep in mind regarding multimeters:

Not all multimeters are created equal. Some multimeters are very basic and only allow you to check for voltage, current, resistance, and perhaps diode polarity. Other multimeters can measure transistor gain, frequency, capacitance, and many other parameters.

There is a large variety in price and features.

Sources & references used in this article: