Hilti 36V Reciprocating Saw Review SR 30-A36


Hilti SR 30-A36 Reciprocating Saw Review

The Hilti SR30-A36 is a new model from Hilti. It’s a high quality saw with many features that make it popular among home users. The design of the saw is based on the same principles as the old models like the SR20 and SR25, but with some improvements such as a larger blade diameter (from 1/2″ to 3/4″ or so), a heavier duty frame, and better ergonomics.

It’s not just the price that makes this saw attractive to consumers: it’s also the fact that it comes with a lifetime warranty! That means if something goes wrong during normal use, they’ll replace your saw for free.

In addition to the warranty, the saw has a few other nice features. For example, there are two different blade sizes available: 12″ and 24″. These blades have slightly different cutting angles than standard 16″ and 20″ blades. They’re designed to cut wood at a variety of thicknesses.

The saw is equipped with a built-in safety switch that prevents the saw from starting up until you push in on its power button.

These features make this saw a good one for both occasional and professional use. I’ve used mine for several months and it’s great. It’s not as loud as the cheaper models, but it still has a powerful enough motor to get through wood quickly. I didn’t even have to make any adjustments when I first used it!

The only issue is that this saw costs about $200. Is it worth the money? That’s your decision to make, but if you’re looking for a reciprocating saw that will last you for years, this may be the one for you.

I hope this was helpful. Have a good day!

How Do I Pick The Right Reciprocating Saw?

If you’re like most people, you’ll probably only purchase a reciprocating saw once or twice in your life. So if you haven’t bought one in awhile, it can be hard to keep up with all the latest features and improvements. If you’re in the market for a new reciprocating saw, then this buying guide will help you sort through all the different models and find the one that’s right for you.

Hilti 36V Reciprocating Saw Review SR 30-A36 from our website

Before we begin, let’s go over some of the basic terminology used to describe reciprocating saws.

The first number in a model number usually refers to the length of the blade, while the second is the diameter of the blade. For example, a model labeled “SRM2-7″ has a 2″ blade and a 0.25” stroke length.

The stroke length is the distance that the blade travels forward and back in one complete motion. The longer this distance, the more power is required from the saw, and therefore they tend to be bulkier and heavier. Most cordless saws have shorter stroke lengths because they draw their power from a battery. A “0” stroke length means that it has no extended stroke length and is only suitable for very light-duty work (like wood).

A higher number before the dash refers to the length of the teeth on the blade, while a lower number refers to the width. For example, “16-0″ means that it has wide teeth with a 16” extended stroke length. “24-6″ has narrow teeth with a 24” extended stroke length.

Another specification that you’ll come across is the amperage (or amps). The higher this number, the more powerful the saw. This measurement describes how much current the motor can draw from the power source (like a battery) to operate.

Last are the grip and trigger configurations. A D-handle is shaped like a “D”, which ensures a firm, steady grip for the user. A pistol grip is shaped like, well, a pistol grip, and some people find them easier to hold and use than D-handles because the weight is closer to your hand.

Now that you’re familiar with the basic terms used to describe reciprocating saws, let’s look at some of the different types available.

Corded Reciprocating Saws

Corded reciprocating saws get their power from a long wire that is connected to a electricity. This is the most common type of reciprocating saw and it’s available in different sizes and price ranges. Wherever you need to cut, you just need to hook up a cord to an outlet and you’re ready to go!

The biggest advantage to corded reciprocating saws is that you don’t have to worry about the battery dying or recharging it. However, since you’re tethered to an extension cord, you do lose a certain degree of maneuverability. It also can be problematic if you’re working somewhere where there aren’t any outlets nearby.

Cordless Reciprocating Saws

As the name implies, cordless reciprocating saws don’t require you to be tethered down to an extension cord. Instead, they’re powered by a rechargeable battery, which allows you greater freedom of movement. However, the length and thickness of the cord will determine how far you can go before the battery dies.

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One type of cordless reciprocating saw is the lithium-ion, which gives you more power than a regular battery and can be recharged without being damaged. It also can retain its charge even if you don’t use it for an extended period of time. However, lithium-ion batteries can be more expensive to replace or repair.

Another type of cordless reciprocating saw uses a standard battery such as nickel metal hydride or NiCad. These types of batteries are cheaper to replace, but they can’t retain a charge as long as a lithium-ion battery and they can be damaged if you don’t recharge them before they’re completely drained.

As the name implies, cordless laser saws use a laser instead of a cord to get their power from an outlet. Like cordless reciprocating saws, cordless laser saws give you the freedom of working anywhere without being tethered down. And since they use a laser instead of a cord, there’s no risk of being tripped over or becoming entangled.

Most cordless laser saws use a lithium-ion battery that can retain its charge for an extended period of time. However, the biggest disadvantage is the price. While cordless laser saws are more expensive than cordless reciprocating saws, they do cost significantly less than corded laser saws.

Now that you know the different types of reciprocating saws available, let’s take a look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of each type:

Corded reciprocating saws are cheap, work anywhere, and are readily available. However, you’re tethered to an extension cord, which can limit your movements.

Cordless reciprocating saws give you much greater freedom of movement since you’re not tied to a cord and they’re generally lighter weight. However, they can be expensive and the battery can die, which requires you to either recharge or swap it out with another one.

Cordless reciprocating saws that use a lithium-ion battery have more power than regular cordless reciprocating saws and don’t suffer from “memory effect.” However, they’re more expensive than both types of cordless reciprocating saws.

Cordless reciprocating saws that use a standard battery can’t retain their charge as long as a lithium-ion battery and they can be damaged if you don’t recharge them before they’re completely drained.

Cordless laser saws give you the freedom of working anywhere without being tethered down. The biggest advantage is that there’s no risk of being tripped over or becoming entangled since there’s no cord to get in your way. On the down side, cordless laser saws are more expensive than corded or cordless reciprocating saws.

Now that you’re familiar with the different types of reciprocating saws available and their advantages and disadvantages, it’s time to take a look at some of the features you should look for when you’re comparing different models and types:

Voltage: Typically a cordless reciprocating saw will run off of a battery that’s 12 volts or less. The higher the voltage, the more powerful the tool. However, this also increases the weight.

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No Load Speed: This is the speed the saw will run when it isn’t plugged into a power source or it’s not running off of a battery. You’ll find that most cordless reciprocating saws have a no-load speed of 3000 SPM or more.

Spindle Size: The larger the spindle size, the more wood your saw can cut through without binding up. Most cordless reciprocating saws have a 5/8 inch spindle.

Blades: The type of blade your saw uses is as important as the motor and spindle size. Most reciprocating saws use a standard pin-end blade, but there are also some that use a keyless blade. Keyless blades require less maintenance and are more convenient since you don’t have to fiddle with a pin to change the blade.

Weight: Since you’ll most likely be using your reciprocating saw for extended periods of time, it only makes sense that you’d want one that’s as light weight as possible. Typically, cordless models are going to be lighter than their corded counterparts.

Hand Grip: You’ll most likely be holding your reciprocating saw for long periods of time, so the grip needs to be comfortable. A rubber grip is going to be preferable to a hard plastic grip that can become slick from prolonged use.

Blade Guard: A blade guard not only protects you from accidentally cutting yourself, but it also helps keep the wood from splintering which could cause the blade to get caught and kick back.

Kickback Pawls: These are metal teeth that are built into the base of the blade. They help catch the wood and prevent it from kicking back.

Types of Blades: Depending on what you’re planning to cut, you’ll need to use a specific type of blade.

General Purpose Blade: Used for everyday cutting, these blades have a curved tooth pattern and are usually around 10-3/4 inches in length.

Hard Wood Blade: These blades are ideal for cutting hardwoods like oak and maple. They have a chisel tooth pattern and are usually around 10-3/4 inches in length.

Reinforcement Blade: Also known as a “spline” blade, this is ideal for cutting reinforced material. It has a flat edge along the bottom of the blade that’s used for exposing the spline of a door. These blades are around 10-3/4 inches in length.

Mat Blade: Used for cutting carpet and fabric, this blade has a zigzag tooth pattern and is usually around 11 inches in length.

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